Sudan: ‘Successful’ Constitutional Reform Spurs Localized Violence

Institutions are important in mitigating the extent to which shocks produce violent consequences, but their effectiveness is conditioned by the behavior of local and international leaders. Ostensibly perfect institutions may fail due to poor stewardship, while even imperfect ones can succeed at preventing violent escalation if local and international political leaders have sufficient political will.

The Emerging Practice of Complex Power Sharing

Examining three main schools of conflict resolution — centripetalism, consociational power sharing and power dividing — and contrasting their analysis and recommendations with current policy to resolve self-determination, this chapter argues that there is...

The Reactive Crisis Management of the EU in the Western Balkans

Co-authored with Annemarie Peen Rodt and published in International Intervention in Local Conflicts: Crisis Management and Conflict Resolution since the Cold War (ed. by Uzi Rabi, Bloomsbury/I.B. Tauris, 2010), this chapter focuses on the European Union’s...

Consociationalism, Power Sharing, and Politics at the Center

Published in The International Studies Encyclopedia in 2010, this chapter outlines the main features of centripetalism, power sharing, and power dividing and of their prescriptions for divided societies. I compare the three schools to one another and showing their...