Liberal Consociationalism in Theory and Practice

My talk for the Middle East and Mediterranean Studies Programme at King’s College London focuses on consociationalism as a theory managing in particular violent conflict in divided societies. I argue that this strategy of conflict management has two broad dimensions that have emerged most clearly in its liberal consociational version-power sharing and self-governance. Beginning with a discussion of power-sharing and subsequently turning to self-governance I examine the conceptual links between them systematically and illustrate my analysis with empirical examples. Engaging with critics of both power sharing and self-governance, I offer a conditional theoretical and empirical defence of liberal consociationalism thus also contributing further to the development of liberal consociational theory and practice.

Date

25 January 2011

Event

Research Seminar

Location

King's College London